2017 AARP Purpose Prize™ winners announced

2017 AARP Purpose Prize™ winners announced


AARP recently announced the five winners of the AARP Purpose Prize™The AARP Purpose Prize™ recognizes outstanding work by people age 50 and over that is focused on advancing social good.

The winners of the 2017 AARP Purpose Prize Award are:

Cynthia Barnett, founder and CEO, Amazing Girls Science, Norwalk, Conn.
Retired high school administrator Barnett was disappointed to see girls losing interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), so she created Amazing Girls Science. Through activities like coding camps, robotics workshops, and hackathons, the nonprofit inspires young girls to consider STEM-focused careers.

Reid Cox, co-founder and CFO, iFoster, Truckee, Calif.
Cox and his wife Serita, a former foster child, put their tech company experience to work in order to help families navigate the challenges of foster care. Their online community, iFoster, connects foster children and families with highly needed financial, educational, and social support resources.

James Farrin, executive director, The Petey Greene Program, Princeton, NJ
In 2007, former business consultant Farrin gathered 20 students from his alma mater Princeton University to tutor prison inmates studying for the GED. The Petey Greene Program — named for a former inmate-turned-activist and popular 70s- and 80s-era radio/TV host — has flourished, with students from 30 colleges now tutoring 1,500 individuals in 34 facilities.

Celeste Mergens, founder and CEO, Days for Girls, Mount Vernon, Wash.
Mergens started Days for Girls eight years ago to supply young girls in a Kenyan orphanage with feminine hygiene products so they wouldn’t have to miss school during their periods. This nonprofit has helped 800,000 women and girls worldwide, sidestepping cultural taboos to educate them about their bodies.

Mike Weaver, Founder, Weaver & Concerned Citizens of Aiken/Atlanta Now (WeCCAAN), Atlanta, Ga.
Former college professor Weaver teaches the value of public service by bringing teens and adults together for service-learning trips to communities in need. From cleaning vacant lots to creating community gardens, Weaver and Concerned Citizens of Aiken/Atlanta Now is making a difference in the lives and futures of its participants as well as the recipients of their volunteerism. Weaver is also the recipient of 2017 Andrus Award for Intergenerational Excellence, named after AARP’s founder.

In recognition of their outstanding community-focused work, each winner will receive a $50,000 cash award from AARP at the AARP Purpose Prize Award Gala, to be held in Chicago November 2.

In addition, AARP named 10 individuals AARP Purpose Prize Awards Fellows, they are: Bonnie Addario, Founder and Chair, Bonnie Addario Lung Cancer Foundation, San Carlos, Calif.; Gary Eichhorn, CEO, Music & Youth Initiative Boston, Mass.; Laurie Green, MD, Founder/ President & CEO, The MAVEN ProjectSan Francisco, Calif.; Annie Griffiths, Executive Director, Ripple Effect Images, Reston, Va.; Cindy Kerr, Founder/CEO, Ryan’s Case for Smiles, Wayne, Pa.; Sister Marilyn Lacey, Mercy Beyond Borders, Santa Clara, Calif.; Ashok Malhotra, Founder/President, The Ninash Foundation, Oneonta, N.Y.; Anne Pollack, Executive Director/Founder, Crossing Point Arts, Inc., New York, N.Y.; Lynn Price, Founder, Camp to Belong, Aurora, Colo., and Juanita Suber, President, My Sistah’s Place/Golden Generations, Inc., St. Petersburg, Fla.

Nominations are now open for the 2018 AARP Purpose Prize, here: www.aarp.org/purposeprize



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AARP Purpose Prize Contest To Recognize Exceptional People Over 50

AARP Purpose Prize Contest To Recognize Exceptional People Over 50


It’s never too late to make an impact on someone’s life and with the AARP Purpose Prize millions of people, over 50, are doing just that. To date, more than 100 Purpose Prize winners have been recognized for their outstanding contributions and the positive, social impact of their work.

The Purpose Prize was created by Encore.org in 2005 as a vehicle to celebrate exceptional individuals over 50, who have utilized their wealth of life experience to encourage continued and innovative social good in their communities.

“The AARP Purpose Prize is all about a new story of aging — focusing on experience and innovation and the idea that our aging population is an untapped resource full of possibilities,” said AARP CEO Jo Ann Jenkins.

We’ve been receiving nominations and applications from great people, doing excellent work, across a broad from all over the country. Reviewing their work has been inspiring and a little humbling, as well.

The people nominated don’t merely muse about making a positive change – they’re actually doing it. All of the prize contenders are helping to redefine what it means to be in their “second act” by using their experiences – up until this point – to bring positive change to their community.

Over the next couple of months, the AARP Purpose Prize jurors will  winnow down the field to just five winners, each of whom will be awarded $50,000 by AARP and one winner will also receive the Andrus Prize for Intergenerational Excellence named for AARP’s founder Dr. Ethel Percy Andrus.

Follow along on the Purpose Prize website to learn more about the program and how you can get involved, next year!



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