What to Know About the Top Summer Scams

What to Know About the Top Summer Scams


As temperatures rise, so do certain scams. Here’s how to avoid getting burned in summer’s most common cons:

Home Repairs
Conning contractors typically come to your home unexpectedly, offering steep discounts on driveway resurfacing, roof work, tree trimming or other “necessary” repairs they happen to see while driving by or soliciting business door-to-door. Most seek an upfront payment to “go buy materials” and then disappear. Others do fast and faulty repairs (like spreading used motor oil to coat driveways) or may stop mid-job to extort more money … or find subsequent chores to continue the wallet-draining. What to know:

  • Good contractors are usually too busy to make unsolicited house calls; out-of-state license plates suggest fly-by-day “gypsy travelers” who spend summers going state to state to con elderly homeowners.
  • Despite scare tactics urging immediate repairs, most home repairs can wait until you get several bids from contractors. Get recommendations (and check results) from neighbors, building officials and lumberyards/plumbing/electrical supply shops where pros shop.
  • Don’t pay until the job is complete. Reputable contractors have credit lines to buy materials, although a deposit may be required for major projects like replacing a roof, windows, etc.

 

Vacation Rentals
Angling for upfront payment (usually by wire transfer or prepaid debit card), scammers steal photos and descriptions of properties from Realtor, hotel or vacation rental websites, and then clone the ads, offering supposed hot-spot “rentals” at discounted prices. What to know:

  • Before answering ads, Google the address, as well as names, emails and phone numbers of the supposed landlord or agent. Also cut and paste into a search engine large chunks of the descriptive text. Red flags include the property is actively up for sale (not for rent), a nonexistent address, an address listed for a business or other nonresidential property, and/or postings by people who fell victim to this particular scammer.
  • Don’t rely solely on email correspondence. Many rental scams are carried out by Nigeria-based scammers (so beware of poorly written ads). You’ll want to talk by phone; beware of foreign accents and area codes that don’t correspond with that of the property’s location.
  • Travel reservations and deposits should be made with a credit card or PayPal — never with a wire transfer or prepaid debit card.

 

Door-to-Door Sales
Summer and fall are prime time for all types of salesmen to come knocking — literally. Some may be legit but others are not. Magazine sales, often touted as a fundraiser, are especially popular bait preying on older Americans; other popular pitches are for bogus charities, home security systems, even overpriced household devices such as vacuum cleaners. What to know:

  • Just say no to strangers. Prices of magazine subscriptions sold door to door, for instance, are often marked up about 300 percent. Legitimate salespeople and fundraisers will have “leave-behind” material to review before opening your wallet.
  • If you do make a purchase and have regrets, act quickly. The FTC’s “Cooling-Off Rule” dictates a three-day cancellation allowance for a full refund on purchases over $25. Legitimate salesmen must reveal this rule during their pitch; if they don’t, assume it’s a scam.
  • Don’t allow sales reps into your home. Asking for a drink of water or to use your bathroom is a popular way to steal medications, purses and other grab-and-go items.

 

Moving
Two of three moves occur in the summer, and thousands each year end this way: After a moving company quotes a reasonable (if not lowball) offer, after the truck is loaded, the quoted price jumps sky-high, and belongings may be held hostage until customers pay the extra money. What to know:

  • Stick with known companies. Most rip-off rogues are movers who advertise on Craigslist or crude roadside signs. Visit protectyourmove.gov and verify a company’s licenses and complaint history.
  • Pass on any mover who won’t do an on-site inspection of your goods (instead giving a sight-unseen estimate), won’t provide a written estimate or says workers will determine the price after loading, demands a large deposit before the move, or asks you to sign blank or incomplete documents. Those red flags indicate a scammer.
  • Moving boosts your risk of identity theft. Know how to protect yourself before, during and after a move.

 

For information about other scams, sign up for the Fraud Watch Network. You’ll receive free email alerts with tips and resources to help you spot and avoid identity theft and fraud, and keep tabs of scams and law enforcement alerts in your area at our Scam-Tracking Map.

 



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